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Posts Tagged ‘Characters’

As you may already know from our Ingleside blog, my friend and I started NaNo off right this year – with a 3-day cruise! That’s right! And, while the first day we wrote all of 500 words, we more than made up for it the second day, and were well on track by the time we went back home.

Of course, then life interferes, and now I am behind again. The fact that my mother-in-law is currently visiting may be impacting that as well. I am at just under 9,000 words so far – which means I am, what, like 2600ish behind if I assume I write everything I need to today (big assumption?). Definitely could be worse!

For the record, I am attempting to write another sappy romance, and it isn’t going super well. I’ve already had to start over once because my brain is so determined these are going to be serious books, despite the setting being a cruise ship. Can someone please have a talk with my characters and tell them to get back in line?

But I am pressing through with my second attempt and seeing if I can restore it to a light-hearted tone (not going well) because I don’t want to start over again. I just need to remember the art of writing-without-thinking. Not an easy task. They should give out awards for that.

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Over the last week, I’ve been far more faithful than I have in awhile to work on my book. As anyone who has been reading this for longer than a few months knows, I’ve been [painfully] trying to edit my sappy romance novel (it’s technically named God’s Masterpiece – but I don’t think I like it. It doesn’t work. I’ve rarely had so much trouble with a title before).

I really do think this revision will make it better – and by re-writing that one scene by hand and then transcribing it BACK to the word document, I’ve rewritten it like three times – but even now as I am typing it back in (and consequently editing it again), I keep thinking it isn’t right. But then, isn’t that what all writers think? It will never be ready?

You know, I am probably the person that is actually true for, unlike others. šŸ˜›

But, as I mentioned very, very briefly in a recent tweet – here’s my current issue: So, Josie is supposed to be quiet and shy and pretty awkward until someone gets to know her (yes, basically exactly like me). But at the same time, she is more confident when she is on her own turf (a.k.a., her home) – and i know this is accurate, because it is exactly how I am. But when trying to translate that to a book, I feel like it comes out, 1. like she is inconsistent character-wise and 2. Like she is annoyingly awkward and can’t stop blushing, which no one likes to read about.

So, that is what I’m trying to work through right now. How to make a heroine that is awkward, without being annoying and still at least a little endearing, shy and uncomfortable, but able to hold her own especially on her own turf, caring, but still gets impatient with her very sick mother (who, by the way is a conundrum herself, since she has cancer, is weak and sick, yet never stops talking and nags part of the time and is loving the other part of the time).

Characters. They drive me up a wall sometimes. Kind of like real people. In which case, maybe it’s okay?

And – that’s my ramble for today.

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I did actually do my 10 minutes yesterday, but didn’t get a chance to do a post. And I did them again today (just now!) So far, I am not super far in rewriting that scene, since I am doing it really in 10 minute increments, but it is interesting to me to see the different turns it is already taking. Like, so far the essence has remained the same, but the characters are behaving differently. My pen insisted on looking at Keith’s point of view instead of Josie’s when Josie went to check on her mother, and they ended up sitting awkwardly in the living room right after he arrived instead of him watching her attempt to cook in the kitchen. I am trying not to think too much about what I have already written in hopes this comes out more naturally than that one did and so far I think it is succeeding, since it seems much more natural for Josie to send him to the living room than invite him into the kitchen. Also, it’s fun to create again instead of just editing.

'It was a last-minute change, but a good one.'

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I am on page 51 of 104. Sometimes I think that, rather than editing this entire section where Keith is snowed in at Josie’s house I need to just push aside what I have and write it again. There is so much that just seems awkwardly phrased. But then again, the part is supposed to be rather awkward, so maybe it is just the situation and no matter how I write it, I will be unhappy. So I will struggle forward and see what happens. And also Josie’s mom is kind of whiny. But then again, she is sick, and who isn’t whiny when they are sick? Being a writer is so hard. Sigh.

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As part of my new year’s resolution, I have a new schedule (as anyone who knows me at all would have already guessed).Ā  I get up at 5:00 AM, do a quick 10-minute workout (sometimes Calisthenics and sometimes stretches as instructed by the chiropractor), get dressed, do hair and makeup, grab the lunch my husband has packed up for me and am out the door by 5:45. I am in DC by 6:00 and at a Starbucks down the street from my building by 6:10, where I get a small coffee and do devotions for half and hour. Then I pack up and am at work by 6:45 AM. This allows me to take a 45 minute lunch break, which I have been using to write. I am trying to do some sort of writing exercise and then work on editing my God’s Masterpiece book.

Today’s writing exercise/sort of lesson was a common theme – making your character suffer. Apparently a lot of authors don’t want bad things to happen to their character. I have never had that issue. I have stopped killing off every one in my books, relegating it to only a few, but those few must go, no matter how much I cry while I write it.

Today I discovered, however, that when it comes to making my characters’ suffer, I am fine with emotional suffering, but I have a hard time with physical suffering. Oh, they can starve to death or be exhausted or things like that but – the book I am going through (Writing Magic by Gail Carson Levine) made me write out the scene in which Red Riding Hood is eaten by the wolf, with instructions to describe exactly how she felt, what she saw, etc. etc., and fairly strict instructions that she was to actually be eaten. I did so, reluctantly – because how horrifying is it to write out a scene in which someone is eaten? Especially since you know that, in non-fairytales – they aren’t actually swallowed in one bite. I wrote it out as much as I could, shuddering inside the whole time, and probably ended it faster than the exercise wanted me to.

But that experiment taught me two things. One, which is what I already mentioned – there is a difference in physical and emotional suffering – and I may have one down, but am terrified of the other. And two, that as terrible as suffering such as that is, it is prime for description and feeling. So, while I doubt I will ever write a book in which someone is eaten, or even physically assaulted outside of perhaps being hit, I am going to work on the physical suffering side, particularly when it comes to descriptions.

And now my 45 minutes are up, so it’s back to work with that awful scene still in my mind. Thanks, Gail. Thanks.

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If you follow my blogger account (you know, that public facing one that technically friends and family can find if they look that I often wonder why I started at all?) then you already know what I am working on. But just in case you don’t, the title of this post will tell you. Because apparently I don’t know how to be mysterious.

I got this book on Writing the Intimate Character in hopes it would help with the issues I’ve been having in Picture of the Past, especially with Elizabeth. And it has really been amazing – the chapters are insightful and the exercises at the end of each chapter really force you to think about itĀ and implement it. I almost feel ready to go back to editing my book itself with some confidence that I can create a better, more relatable character. Almost. Maybe I should finish readingĀ the other book first. Either way, I have been quite pleased with the purchase.

So, I’ve said this before – but I would really like to be finished editing my book before NaNoWriMo. Maybe not publishing worthy done editing, but maybe someone reading it and telling me what they think worthy. It is amazing, isn’t it, how you can lose confidence in a thing you’ve been working on for years? The more I work on it the more useless and unentertaining I fear people will find it. So we’ll see what happens.

Life has been a little crazy, which makes it hard to make time for editing. I thought I learned from my self-imposed challenge that making 15 minutes to work on something isn’t that hard, but apparently I didn’t learn it enough because I am right back to my old habits of assuming I don’t have enough time to work on it at all. I should get one (or more) of my friends to hold me accountable or something.

For you Christians out there, we are going through some difficult personal life stuff, so prayers would be much appreciated at this time – prayers for courage and for health/healing.

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Yes, I did my 15 minutes. I used it (well, really, half an hour) to finish up a couple scenes I stopped in the middle of last week.

I have no profound things to say about my self-imposed 7 day challenge. Certainly nothing that hasn’t been said before by “real” writers and multiples of them. But I have to say, forcing myself to write for 15 minutes a day every day for 7 days has made a difference for me. In two specific ways:

1. I have rediscovered my story. Not only do I, for the first time in months, remember what I was trying to do with my book, but I feel like I am beginning to understand my characters more as well. And, for the first time since I wrote the first draft, I am thinking about my characters throughout the day and what they should be doing in their story. I am actually excited about getting back to editing it and – hopefully – finish soon!

2. This may be simple for you, but it is actually profound for me. It IS possible to write for 15 minutes a day. Because it was a challenge and because I committed to writing about it every day on the blog, I did not allow myself excuses. Even the one evening we didn’t go to bed until past midnight and writing my 15 minutes meant staying up until 1:00 on a weeknight, I still did it and, more importantly, I did not regret doing it. The only thing I regretted most evenings was not having more time to spend on it (and, indeed, there were nights I spent far more than 15 minutes).

This has been a great experience for me and I really hope I don’t let it fall by the wayside now that I no longer have an obligation (self-imposed, granted) to write about what I did every day.

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